[Alert] Relief Advisory Approval Department Scam!

relief advisory approval department scam

A recent fraud has surfaced in the market, purporting to provide pre-approved loans to individuals as a means of relief during difficult financial circumstances.

We’ll highlight several scams in this post and teach you how to avoid falling for them.

What is the Relief Advisory Approval Department?

The Relief Advisory Approval agency frequently claims that victims have been “pre-approved” for $48,000, impersonating a lending agency with loan approval authority. It is a relatively fresh offering on the market and has become well-known in recent months.

Relief Advisory Approval Departemen

Nonetheless, we must warn our readers that the Relief Advisory Department is a total fraud, and any claims it makes using any of its methods are a ruse used by con artists to deceive innocent individuals.

Relief Advisory Approval Department Scam

The Relief Advisory Approval Department’s operations begin with an unsolicited voicemail that those experiencing financial hardships receive. The voicemail sounds like a robocall and is heavily prerecorded.

The Voicemail from the Relief Advisory Approval Department goes like this:

“Yes this is Sarah calling from Relief Advisory Approval Department. My phone number is 802-192-108. I’m not sure if you’ve spoken to an assigned agent, but I do see your pre-approval is for up to $48,000 on a few new programs that have recently taken effect. So what I’ll do is just go ahead and keep this in pending status for you. And if you have about 15 minutes today, give me a call back and we can go over the details with you as well as the benefits. Again, my phone number is 802-192-108. Thank you.”

In addition, the victim is deceived into believing they have been pre-approved for a $48,000 loan. The robocall voicemail asks him to return the call to the specified phone number. The con artists answer the phone after contacting that number and pretend to be from the Relief Advisory Approval Department.

Following an explanation of how to obtain a $48,000 loan, the con artists request personal data from their victims, including name, date of birth, address, and bank account information.

These particulars are sufficient for con artists to take funds from your bank account in the future.

Once the victims’ personal information has been obtained, they typically want a small payment—between $100 and $200—to release the loan funds. The con artists disconnect the call and block the victim’s phone as soon as they get the money needed to release the loan funds.

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What To Do?

You should immediately disregard any voicemails or robocalls you hear from the “Relief Advisory Approval Department” and don’t return their calls at the given phone number.

Scammers’ primary goal is to obtain your personal and financial information and steal your money, and they have been successful in doing this to a sizable portion of the population.

It is therefore preferable to disregard these unsolicited voicemails that purport to offer pre-approved loans.

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